History Lesson Log #3: Ancient Greece

I usually wait until I’ve covered three history topics until I write another log, but I’m eager to share our Ancient Greece resources. We spent quite awhile with Ancient Greece because The Odyssey and the myths took a long time to read, and we’ve been taking a break this summer from history too.

Although these are the resources I’ve used so far for Ancient Greece, we probably won’t stop here. I will add more resources to this list as we find them. I plan to move on to Ancient Rome in the near future, but my eleven-year-old is interested in doing U.S. history too, so we’re going to start with that this September, and we’ll see how long it takes to get back to ancient history. Having a big timeline on our wall helps us keep the dates straight! If you have any questions about anything, don’t hesitate to e-mail me.

Ancient Greece

Sources I’ve used for this topic:

Web

My husband’s lecture and screencast titled “Ancient Greece

Odyssey Online: Greece (See field trips below for explanation)

 

Home Library

The Kingfisher History of Encycolpedia, pages 52-56

The Usborne Encylcopedia of World History, pages 154-161

Story of the World, Volume 1: Ancient Times, pages 137-187

 

From the Local Library

Ancient Greece by Philip Wilkinson

The Odyssey retold by Geraldine McCaughrean and illustrated by Victor G. Ambrus

D’Aulaires’ Book of Greek Myths by Ingri and Edgar Parin D’Aulaires

 

Documentaries

There are some fun videos on Ted Ed about Ancient Greece. Do a search for Ancient Greece.

 

Field Trips

Michael C. Carlos Museum at Emory University – This museum has artifacts from many ancient cultures! According to their website: “Some 17,000 artifacts from ancient Egypt, the Near East, Greece, Rome, the Americas, Asia, and Africa, as well as works on paper from the Renaissance to the present day.” We spent an afternoon this summer at Emory, and we loved this museum. A post about this museum is coming up next.

If you aren’t local, check out their website. They have Odyssey Online, which are interactive web sites for kids. Some of these are still in the making, but the one on Greece is great. They also have a podcast.

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