Art Lessons + Math

If you read Our Summer Homeschooling Plans, you’ll know I wanted to concentrate on math this summer. I also wanted to keep up with art, and I’m happy to say we did this, and we even got to visit some art museums, which I’ll post about later.

Because of my plan to work on math, I was so happy that my go-to art resource had an issue about art and math. If you haven’t checked out Amy Hood’s e-zine, Art Together, I urge you to look at them. They aren’t expensive, but Amy worked hard at filling them with easy ways to include art into your life. Of course, you have to set time aside and be intentional about this, which is why almost every Friday is art day in my house.

So here’s a little of what we did on various Fridays, using Amy’s Issue 6: Math + Art.

distorted shapes

the five-year-old did this one

Then he took the triangle I made and did something different, which is always okay.

I was the only one that did the paper weaving, although the five-year-old decided to do his own version of it. I don’t require either of my boys to do the art lessons because I think art should be voluntary and fun. If they see the possibilities through what I do, I know they have still learned something.

The best lesson was on the Fibonacci sequence. The eight-year-old loved this, and we watched videos about the Fibonacci sequence to supplement the learning.

Then my son came up with the idea to measure popsicle sticks with Fibonacci numbers and make a little sculpture with it.

Exploring mandalas. This also made a nice lesson on different cultures as mandalas are used in various religions, including Hinduism, Buddhism and American Native American cultures too. Google “mandala” and you’ll find many beautiful images and designs.

See how fun math can be?!

4 thoughts on “Art Lessons + Math

  1. This is wonderful! I love Amy’s zines (we have the printmaking one) and my boys totally dig the Fibonacci numbers. Must try the popsicle stick thing. Math was not this fun when I was growing up!

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