Art Fridays: Homeschool Art Lessons

I was pleasantly surprised that they got into my lesson about still life.

If I had more time, I would write a post after each art session, but instead I’m trying to catch up this homeschool year on my blog. (This is why I’ve been posting more lately, or actually, why I scheduled a bunch of posts over a few days in early February. Those will eventually run out. As you can see, I blog in spurts. Or between magazine issues. 🙂 )

So here’s a little assemblage of various “art days” that usually take place on Fridays, though art is not restricted to that day. The boys do a lot of art projects on their own, but Fridays are the days when I initiate something, and sometimes I try to teach them a new technique and tell them about an artist who used that technique. I am neither an artist, nor do I know a lot about art, so I have used a few resources to help me out. My favorite go-to resource for this has been Amy Hood’s Art Together e-zine.

Some Fridays when I’m not (ahem) prepared, I say things like “My only requirement of you today is to draw a picture in your sketchbook.” (This usually results in more than one piece of artwork.) Or one morning, I woke up early and had already started to paint some of the nature collection that my son had left on the table the day before. When my boys saw me doing that, they immediately wanted to join me. (I didn’t know that this is called a “provocation” until I read Amy Hood’s recent art column in home / school / life.)

Sometimes I try to teach the boys a new technique, and they are not interested in doing the project, such as when I showed them Joseph Cornell’s art boxes (via Art Together). Usually they want to do something else like paint or draw. This is fine. Unlike math and reading, I don’t require them to do the art lessons because I think art should be fun and voluntary. When they see me produce the art, they are still learning about that technique, and they learn a new possibility.

Looking back over these art sessions, I’m reminded that there was a time when I felt like our homeschool was desperately missing out on art. Because of that, I was intentional about starting “Art Fridays.” I’m so pleased with how this has turned out, and I think my boys have benefitted from it greatly. Of course, there are other things I feel like we are missing out on, such as Spanish lessons or belonging to a big homeschool group, but alas, one thing at a time. As many homeschool moms have told me, you can’t do everything, and you shouldn’t worry about doing everything, and someday you may look back and realize you did more than enough.

Click on an image to enlarge and read the caption. Also, a big thanks to Mo Akwati for his tutorial on how to draw a moth, which my dissatisfaction of my own drawing inspired him to do.

 

12 thoughts on “Art Fridays: Homeschool Art Lessons

  1. Oh my gosh–that photo gallery! So much great stuff going on there. Yay for stamp carving and all that printmaking and the art exploration–all such wonderful stuff. On tracing the feathers–YES!–my daughter traced leaves before adding watercolor and it made it such a satisfying experience for her, which at this age is really important. I’m sincerely happy you’re finding the zine helpful–that it goes out there and fills a need for someone is really gratifying.

    Also how great is it that your kids inadvertently left a provocation for YOU?! I love that. 🙂

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    1. Hi Amy — Thanks so much for the comment on my blog. I’ve really enjoyed your e-zines, and I especially like that I can continue to go back through them and get ideas and inspiration. 🙂 So glad to hear about your daughter tracing leaves. I’ve been trying to encourage my son to try drawing different things, but he would rather color in coloring books or use stencils. I’m okay with that, of course. But I always wonder what else I can do that will help him eventually get to the next step. But did you see his attempt at drawing the still life?! I was so excited he did that!

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